How Saving Cayuga Park United the Neighborhood

Cayuga Sketch

By and large, most older people want to remain in their own homes as long as possible. Senior services professionals call it “aging in place.”

For the neighbors in Cayuga Terrace, a residential neighborhood of single-family homes tucked away between Geneva Avenue, San Jose Avenue and Alemany Boulevard, aging in place demands residents know and care for one another.

Until several years ago, that didn’t exist. Continue Reading →

Mission Terrace Homes Flood—Again

Flooding Illustration

Imagine you just moved to San Francisco’s lovely Mission Terrace neighborhood tucked in between Interstate 280 and Alemany Boulevard. You’ve had just enough time to meet a few neighbors, get used to some of the area street names and maybe hit the town once or twice while you settle in. Keep in mind California is in the middle of a record drought.

Bam! December roars in like a lion, and floods your street not once but twice in just a couple of weeks. It hasn’t rained since. This is the exact situation Blane Bachelor found herself in at the end of 2014. Continue Reading →

Picture Perfect: Photography Studio in the Excelsior Specializes in Portraits

NATASHA DANGOND/THE INGLESIDE-EXCELSIOR LIGHT

At the corner of Mission Street and Geneva Avenue, directly above a cheap household goods store across the street from Bank of America, a few photographers and filmmakers snap and edit away above the busy street from their second floor studios.

Anyone who travels down Geneva Avenue through the heavily trafficked intersection would instantly recognize the building. It’s the one with the long bank of exposed, windowless exterior next to the bus stop on Geneva Avenue that is forever being vandalized by graffiti artists. Continue Reading →

Only the Community Can Fix Up Balboa Park Station

Alexander Mullaney / The Ingleside Light

Balboa Park Station may be the busiest transit hub in San Francisco outside of downtown, the terminus for the J, K and M streetcar lines, crossroads of the 29, 43, 54, 36, 47 and 8 bus lines, as well as a BART station and transfer point to San Francisco International Airport, but what it is probably recognized most for is its utter bleakness.

People go there because they have to go somewhere else on public transit, either by being dropped off at the derelict kiss-and-ride loop or hazarding treacherous sidewalks and crossing freeway ramps with dubiously marked crosswalks. Continue Reading →